Shopping Spots to Visit When in Tokyo

Tokyo is a modern metropolis that’s home to over 13 million people from all walks of life. It’s a thriving metropolis filled with the rich culture and history of Japan. Tokyo’s scene is a mix of modern, traditional, local, and foreign influences, making it one of the best places to live and learn when in Japan.  Though the bustling city may be one of the most expensive places to live in, it still has some of the best shopping spots to find the best quality products and keepsakes to remind you of your visit to Japan. Here are some of the must-visit shopping places in Tokyo:

Harajuku. | bpinzini

Harajuku – Harajuku encompasses from Harajuku Station to Omotesando, including smaller backstreets like Takeshita Street and Cat Street, to Sendagaya to the north and Shibuya to the south. You can join in the popular cosplay culture, and shop at thrift boutiques and even at some of the world-famous high-end fashion chains.  Harajuku is also very close to other local attractions such as the Meiji ShrineYoyogi Park, and Yoyogi National Gymnasium.

Asakusa – Nakamise-dōri establishments in Asakusa are used as a large single canvas with images meticulously depicting traditional events and scenes for each season in Asakusa.

Nakamise-dōri. | Caribb

The street, about 250 meters long, has around 90 shops. It’s a worthwhile visit just to look at the amazing artwork even when the stores have already closed for the night.

Kappabashi –  or what it’s commonly known for, “Chef’s Paradise”. It’s a street between Asakusa and Ueno where all kitchen tools and table ware can be found up for grabs for any aspiring cook or chef. The prices are reasonable and the area is known for selling the finest quality Japanese chef knives.

Kappabashi. | Steven Johnson

Akihabara – Akihabara means “Field of Autumn Leaves,” but it’s more popularly known as Akihabara Electric Town. Most locals call it “Akiba” for short. It is very accessible–less than 5 minutes away from Tokyo Station.  Stores that sell brand new items are mostly in Chūōdōri (the main street), while the back streets of Soto Kanda 3-chōme sell used gadgets.